A Letter to The Economist

From ROGER HELMER MEP

Conservative, East Midlands

Dear Sir,

Water resources for agriculture

In your important article about global water resources (May 22nd), you lament the fact that “no one has yet managed to produce plants that offer dramatically more crop per drop”. Yet there is a development which offers precisely that outcome.

Rising atmospheric CO2 levels dramatically increase crop yields. Indeed many horticulturalists deliberately raise CO2 levels in greenhouses by a factor of three, from below 400 ppm to around 1200 ppm, to enhance growth rates and yields. Less well known is the fact that this technique delivers not only rapid growth, but also more efficient water use — more “crop per drop”.

It is a great shame that climate alarmists not only exaggerate the potential problems of rising atmospheric CO2, but stubbornly ignore the many benefits, especially in terms of feeding a growing world population.

Yours faithfully,

ROGER HELMER MEP

http://www.rogerhelmer.com

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2 Responses to A Letter to The Economist

  1. Chris P says:

    never fear mr Helmer. It least the wind turbines are not doing anything to reduce CO2, or anything else. NETA energy returns for this morning have given wind as 0.0% (4MW) from Great Britains wind fleet (out of a total for today of 38,872MW by all methods)
    Absurd figures liking this, being normal for weeks.
    Does the government not know?

  2. Spot on Chris (I’m writing from the Lotte Hotel in Seoul, Korea). It seems no one believes the nonsense any more except a few zealots, assorted rent seekers (like Al Gore), — and, of course, the politicians!

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