UKIP & Lib-Dems level-pegging on 11%

 

A Survation Poll for the Daily Mail today shows UKIP and the Lib-Dems tied for third place at 11%.  UKIP in double figures and third equal.  OK, so one opinion poll doesn’t prove a lot by itself, just as two swallows don’t make a summer.  But this follows a period when UKIP has been heading up steadily (and attracting large crowds to public meetings).  And of course the Lib-Dems have been edging down fairly conspicuously.

It’s worth mentioning that while Survation treats UKIP fairly, a number of other polling organisations simply don’t break out the UKIP result — so their “Others” figures get so high as to make the whole exercise suspect.  Others apply tighter “likelihood to vote” criteria for UKIP than for other parties.  This could be because of pressure from large media clients who don’t want to see UKIP featuring in the results.

What I’m seeing more and more as a new UKIP MEP is that whatever seems to make sense to the man in the street, or the woman in the pub, also turns out to be UKIP policy.

Take Europe.  Most people want trade and cooperation with Europe.  Far from the Polly Toynbee caricature of eurosceptics as Little Englanders, we are the global traders — and we don’t want to be Little Europeans.

But most people also want to live in an independent, self-governing, democratic country.  They are angry about our inability, under the ECHR, to expel the most egregious criminals and terrorists.  They think it’s sheer madness — and they’re right.  If they work in the NHS, or the haulage or hospitality industries, they’re angry about the impact of EU employment policies.  If they work in the City, they’re angry that we’ve handed financial regulation to Brussels.

If they know about the cost of EU membership, they’re angry about that too.  UKIP loves to talk about £50 million a day, but that’s just our EU budget contributions.  Add in the vast costs of EU regulation, and it’s more like £250 million a day.  So UKIP’s policy of leaving the EU but maintaining trade links makes a lot of sense.

Or take energy.  Of course people are angry about the impact of wind turbines on local communities, blighting homes and villages and lives.  But more and more also understand that the renewables policies imposed from Brussels are driving up energy costs and making our industries uncompetitive.  We are forcing businesses and jobs and investment offshore (often to jurisdictions with lower emissions standards).  China and India are building cheap coal-fired power stations; America is looking forward to an industrial renaissance based on cheap indigenous gas.  But we in Europe are saddling ourselves with hopelessly uneconomic renewables which will rapidly become obsolete.

Workers from the Kingsnorth power station in Kent, who recently lost their jobs, are angry about the EU’s Large Combustion Plant Directive, which caused their plant to close, and which will close several more in the next couple of years.  (See how other issues like energy are also driven by our EU membership).

And we are forcing up domestic energy prices, driving millions more households, and especially pensioners, into fuel poverty.  UKIP would press ahead with nuclear and gas, which ironically could deliver the EU’s emissions targets (if you care about such things) more quickly and cheaply than the current plan, and without a single wind turbine.  We’d prioritise shale gas exploration.  We’d also keep the coal-fired power stations open to the end of their working lives — by which the whole climate change/CO2 panic will be over.

People can’t understand why we increase foreign aid while we cut services at home.  They can’t see why we need to give money to countries that have their own aid programmes, and space programmes, and nuclear programmes.  UKIP would limit spending on aid and focus in on immediate help for natural disasters.

People are worried about our welfare spending.  They recognise (as Simon Heffer put it) that we have an underclass because we have decided to pay for one.  They believe that work should always be more rewarding than idleness.  So does UKIP.

And they worry about immigration.  UKIP is not opposed in principle to immigration — the economy needs some immigrants — but the numbers must be manageable in our small island.  And we absolutely insist that no immigrant should go straight from the boat to the hospital or benefit office.  Social benefits should be available to legal immigrants only after they have demonstrated that they can work to support themselves, and to pay their taxes.  Again, a common sense policy which most UK citizens would support.  And immigrants are welcome only if they are prepared to respect the values of the host country.  Too many are not.

I could go on, but you get the point.

Increasingly, the terms “right” and “left” seem to be losing meaning and relevance (although in economic terms I make no apology for taking a classical-liberal view).  UKIP simply gives voice to the common-place, common-sense views of decent British people.  We attract former Conservatives, but also former Labour members.  We believe in freedom, independence and democracy.  In enterprise and free markets.  In low taxes and limited government.  In family and nation.  And I stress (for Polly Toynbee’s benefit) that when I say “nation”, I mean it not in the sense of “Blood and Soil”, but in terms of a proper pride in our identity, our history, our values, our achievements.  Or as Churchill put it, “Our Island Story”

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10 Responses to UKIP & Lib-Dems level-pegging on 11%

  1. Maureen Gannon says:

    I cannot believe that people are willing to entrust this once great nation back into the hands of MPs such as Millipede and Balls .
    I certainly cannot see the CONDems getting back in , so the fact this is a five year term it really is for UKIP to raise its game get a few MPs elected so that people see them as a party with more ideas than just getting out of the fradulent body that rules us.

  2. Tim french says:

    This result is very encouraging, The next thing I would like to see is the media to stop putting UKIP into the ‘others’ catagory when quoting poll results as this would make the public really sit up & take notice,
    I know its a big ask from some of them (such as the BBC) who are blatantly so pro EU it would go against their biased principles, But hopefully a good few results would force them to change their attitude & actually do some honest reporting for once.

  3. James A. Hutchinson says:

    Roger , I fully agree and endorse each and every comment made in a/m article . As Maureen Gannon says ” ……………this once great nation……………”
    This LibDem/Con coalition behave like schoolboys still wet behind the ears .
    I’m pleased to see UKIP in double figures in the poll , but they need to publicize their aims and ambitions more to the great British public .
    Keep up the good work .

  4. radsatser says:

    Roger.

    As somebody who has been UKIP minded for many years, votes for them and supports the UKIP position on blogs, I welcome this rise, but I am realistic enough not get carried away.

    Of more importance is the woeful state of the the party machine. As many others have said, for years contacting UKIP is akin to trying to contact your long dead Grandad through a medium. In fact it is harder because occasionally the medium tells you Grandad has a message for you, whilst UKIP never respond, if it was a commercial organisation it would have been bankrupt years ago.

    It has no concept of customer service or building and keeping a membership base. Whilst it is gaining membership, the key in long term support is embracing them once on board and getting them to renew, not ignoring them before they have even got their feet under the table once the money is in the pot.

    Once they experience how incompetent and disinterested the party mechanism is, I imagine the churn is considerable. The failure of the Conservative party to be inclusive to its membership should be an object lesson in how not to run a party, yet UKIP seem equally as cackhanded, if not more so.

    UKIP is riding on a high at the moment, and attracts a lot of transient people, but if my experiences are anything to go by, the more casual supporter will give up at the first blanking.

    To be be honest it is the policies that are important to me not the party, and I would imagine that is the case for most people.

    Tell your leadership to get a grip, you might get a response!

    • ogga1 says:

      Hello radsatser,
      I am in my third year with UKIP, have no complaints and am kept well informed,
      Roger i heard you when you visited Louth,Linc’s you were good then and improving with
      time ,Good luck.
      OGGA1.

  5. Mike Spilligan says:

    Mr. H: I recently joined UKIP, in a way reluctantly, as I’ve never belonged to a political party before, and that in a 6 decade + lifespan. But somehow UKIP needs to push through the biggest barrier, the almost complete proscription of the Party by the BBC. As you point out, polls lumping UKIP with Others don’t help, but presumably UKIP HQ has the right to complain to polling organizations.
    At least there seems to be, now, an understanding that there will never be any changes in EU dominance that are initiated from within, and that can now be seen as a way the Europhiles have deliberately prevaricated and procrastinated on this hypothesis.

  6. A. Statistician says:

    11% is a “tipping point”
    This is the percentage where support for any point of view, political party, or indeed any enterprise, is likely to gain momentum, rather than lose momentum. It is the point at which news organisations are likely to take notice of events. It is the percentage that will get the attention of trends forecasters at the stock exchange. In short 11% is a significant milestone. All other things being equal, then support should rapidly increase from this point, and patronage may snowball. Lib Dems must be quaking in their shoes.

  7. Alan Love says:

    “….whatever seems to make sense to the man in the street, or the woman in the pub, also turns out to be UKIP policy.”
    That is, of course, UKIP’s great strength. As long as we continue to voice the concerns of the electorate at large and avoid the detachment of the “Westminster village” we will inevitably gain Westminster seats sooner rather than later.
    Congratulations on an excellent post.

  8. francis says:

    Well UKIP must draw support from Labour voters as well as the Tories. The Tories always complain the UKIP steals votes from them but the reality may be different. It was said that in Scotland the SNP took votes from Labour however evidence suggests that the majority of the former Scottish Tory vote went the SNP.

    Labour fear UKIP, just as much as the Tories do.

  9. lynda brookhouse says:

    I come from a family of labour supporters.my great grandad was a Labour councillor in golborne near Warrington.I’ve always been interested in politics even though I don’t always fully understand the jargon. What I have realised over the past few years is that ukips policies reflect the feelings of most of the people that I know….everyone is fed up of being governed by Brussels and the numbers of immigrants flooding into the country to steal our benefits without any intention of working for an honest days pay.the only way out of this mess is to vote ukip…..but you need to raise your profile. Whenever seen any ukip advertising or a party political broadcast by ukip…..

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